Seniors, 65 and Older

Women

After the age of 65, women may be required to visit the doctor much more frequently to monitor and address physical and mental conditions linked with aging. Some of these concerns include:

  • Osteoporosis: Women who are not at high-risk of osteoporosis should still receive a bone mineral density test at the age of 65.
  • Breast exam: Women between the ages of 65 and 74 should continue to receive mammograms every two years. At the age of 75, female patients should consult with their doctor to determine whether or not future breast exams will be needed.
  • Pelvic exam and Pap smear: Women who have received three negative pap smears within the last ten years may stop getting pelvic examinations and smears once they are 65.
  • Colorectal screening: Women should continue to receive regular colorectal exams until the age of 75, at which time they should consult with a doctor to determine if future screenings are needed.
  • Glaucoma: Women over the age of 65 are at higher risk of glaucoma, an eye disease that can lead to damaged optic nerves and eventually blindness. Regular check-ups with an optometrist will help women in this age group mitigate the risk of glaucoma.
  • Vaccines: Women 65 or older should receive a pneumococcal (pneumonia) immunization if they have not done so already, or if more than five years have passed between the last PPSV vaccine and their 65th birthday.

Men

Men 65 and older are especially vulnerable to diseases and physical conditions, and as a result, this age group will probably require more frequent doctor visits than their younger counterparts. Elderly men should discuss the following medical issues with their physicians:

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm: This condition develops when the aorta swells and begins to balloon, which can lead to an aortic tear (which is fatal more than 20% of the time). Men between the ages of 65 and 75 are much more vulnerable to an abdominal aortic aneurysm than women, especially certain risk factors apply:
    • Obesity
    • Family history
    • High blood pressure
    • High cholesterol
    • Tobacco use
  • Vaccines: Any male over the age of 65 should consider obtaining a pneumococcal (pneumonia) immunization if they have not done so already, or if more than five years have elapsed between their most recent PPSV vaccine and the patient’s 65th birthday.
  • Colorectal screening: Men should continue to receive regular colorectal exams until the age of 75, at which time they should consult with a doctor to determine if future screenings are needed.
  • Glaucoma: Men over the age of 65 are at risk of glaucoma, an eye disease that can lead to damaged optic nerves and eventually blindness. Regular check-ups with an optometrist will help men in this age group mitigate the risk of glaucoma.